Tag Archives: Courage

 

‘These three mysteries the warrior must understand: Life, Harmony and Spirit. The first is life, sometimes called the Greek gift, for it is taken back, day after day. What is it? It is breath, it is laughter, it is joy. The brighter the light, the shorter its existence. But one thing is certain – and the warrior knows this. All lives end. A man can hide in a cave all his days, avoiding war, avoiding pestilence, and still he will one day die. Better the bright flame, the great joy. A man who has never known sorrow can never appreciate joy. So the man who has not faced death can not understand life.

Harmony is the second mystery. The tree knows harmony, and the breeze and the quiet stars. Man rarely finds it. Find it now, here on this lonely hill. Listen to the beating of your heart, feel the air in your lungs, see the glory of the moon. Be at one with the night. Be at one with these stones. Be at one with your sword and yourself. For in harmony is strength, and in strength there is life.

Lastly there is Spirit. Tonight you will want to run… to hide… to escape. But spirit will tell you to stand firm. It is a small voice and easy to shut out. But you will listen. For spirit is all a man has against the Darkness. And only by following the voice of spirit can a man grow strong. Courage, loyalty, friendship and love are all gifts of the spirit.’

Revelation, to Cormac, Last Sword of Power

 

‘Do not make the mistake of judging a man’s physical courage, or his skills, by the work he is forced to do. I knew a doctor once who could put an arrow through a gold ring at forty paces. And a street cleaner in Drenan who once held off twenty Sathuli warriors, killing three, before he carried his injured officer back to camp. Judge a man by his actions, not his occupation.’

Angel, to Miriel, Waylander II: In the Realm of the Wolf

 

Now this is how courage and fear work, lad. Both will always be pushing. They are never still. And a man cannot choose to stop pushing. For if he backs away the fear will come after him, and push him pack another step, and then another. Men who give in to fear are like kings who trust in castles to keep out enemies, rather than attacking them on open ground, and scattering them. So the enemies camp round the castle, and now the king cannot get out. Slowly his food runs out, and he discovers the castle is not a very safe place to be.

Odysseus, to Helikaon, Lord of the Silver Bow